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Senior Pet Project: Beautiful Buddha

Beautiful Buddha, our slightly portly ginger senior, arrived at Sydney Dogs and Cats Home in February after being found wandering the streets as a stray.  Given her girth and the fact that she was desexed, we assumed she was owned.  However, Buddha wasn’t wearing a collar with identification, nor was she microchipped, and sadly, no one came forward to reclaim this gentle old soul.

Aside from her sweet nature, Buddha’s most distinguishing attribute was her cherry eye, a little pink mass protruding from her left eyelid.  Cherry eye occurs when the gland of the third eyelid prolapses.

With Buddha’s hold period elapsing and no owner found to reclaim her, our vet team immediately organised a corrective surgery for Buddha’s eye.

Thanks to the generous support of the community who donate to our Senior Pet Project initiative, Sydney Dogs and Cats Home can provide our senior pets like Buddha with the additional vet treatment they require.

If left unattended and continuously exposed, cherry eyes can become painful, inflamed and irritated.  Also, if Buddha rubbed her eye, it could bleed and even become infected.

We are pleased to report that Buddha’s surgery was a complete success and she’s made a rapid recovery.  Now in our care for four months, Buddha is patiently waiting for a forever home.   This sweet girl who wants nothing more than to curl up in the sun or on your lap to get lots of pats.  For information on adopting Buddha, please drop into the shelter or email info@sydneydogsandcatshome.org


ABOUT SENIOR PET PROJECT

Our Senior Pet Project, entering its second year, was started as an initiative not only to put a spotlight on these golden oldies to help with their rehoming, but also to raise the funds required for their much needed veterinary care and often prolonged stay at the Home.

With your support we are looking to raise $150,000 by 30 June to fund the Senior Pet Project for the next 12 months, enabling us to give the seniors entering our care a new leash on life.

Support the Senior Pet Project. Donate today.

Going to the Turkeys

At Sydney Dogs and Cats Home, we can never be sure who the ranger will bring through our door. This month we welcomed two turkeys, Brad and Chad, who were found roaming in the Bayside Council area.

With no one coming forward to reclaim Brad and Chad, the team reached out to several rescue groups before finding one that could provide Brad and Chad with a suitable home. And thanks to our fantastic network of supporters, we were able to find a volunteer ready to make the three-hour drive to transfer the dynamic duo.

We are pleased to report that Brad and Chad are happily enjoying the green pastures of the Sunny Corner Farm Sanctuary and handing out with their new friends, pictured below.

 

Hunting for a Home

Cats, like us, can lose their hearing with age, but some kittens are born deaf. Hereditary deafness is more common in white-coated cats, and at the moment we have two such kitties in our care – Hunter and Nicky.

Three-year-old Hunter came into the shelter as a stray more than a month ago. Sadly we were not able to find Hunter’s humans, and no one came to reclaim him. Hunter is now waiting to land himself a forever home.

We also have little Nicky (pictured left) who arrived just days ago and is currently in foster care where she can put on some weight before becoming available for adoption.

Deaf cats make lovely, loving companions, but they do have some special needs in terms of their care. As they can not hear a barking or growling dog or vehicle approaching, deaf cats need to be indoor only cats. Also, because of their pale pink noses, they are more susceptible to skin cancer, another good reason to keep them as inside.

Deaf cats have a reputation of being more vocal and having a louder meow then their hearing counterparts. However, Hunter has been roaming and playing in the cattery, and he is not at all vocal. He’s very outgoing and animated but definitely not loud or particularly chatty.  Although he does love to purr.

As deaf cats have lost one sense, their reliance on visual cues is heightened. A deaf cat or kitten can be trained using visual cues. Cats like Hunter can be taught to come to you by simply crouch down and luring him with tasty treats. Hunter loves his pats however, so you probably won’t have to do this to gain his attention and affection.

With their heightened visual sense, it can be beneficial for the deaf cat to have another feline in the home.  The deaf kitty can take visual cues or mimic behaviours it sees in the other cat.

Cats also feel vibrations, so if you are walking towards a deaf kitty, it may detect the vibration of the floor and come running to greet you. Similarly opening a door may also create a disturbance in the air which your feline could feel like a slight breeze on their fur, alerting him or her that you are home.  Based on Hunter’s personality he’ll definitely be looking to greet you when you get home; he’s always looking for a cuddle.

If you would like to give either Hunter or Nicky a home, please contact the team at info@sydneydogsandcatshome.org

Lovely Lilly Settling into a New Home

This beautiful girl is Lilly. She’s was adopted from Sydney Dogs and Cats Home earlier this year.

Lilly settled into home life perfectly, sleeping for hours and exhibiting no destructive behaviour at all. But on walks she was struggling, particularly when she saw other dogs.

This is why Lilly’s new family decided to enlist the help of one of our recommended behaviourists Ian Shivers from Bondi Behaviourist.  Below Ian explains his approach to helping Lilly and her humans:

Like with many rescues, nobody is 100% sure what happened in her life before she got re-homed but with this sort of situation it’s not usually about any trauma or negative experiences that are causing these reactions, it’s often down to what hasn’t happened.

It’s likely that Lilly wasn’t exposed to much, and simply doesn’t have the coping skills for the vast amounts of information out there in the big wide world.

So that’s our job, to take her out and expose her to the world at a pace that she can manage.

During the session we went through body language to look out for, how to handle the leash, when to, how to and why use food rewards, how to reduce stress when it sets in and how to respond in different scenarios. Over time, we can build her confidence, her relationship with the family and her trust in other dogs.

Ian’s description of Lilly is true of many of the residents who come through the Home, many who we believe didn’t get exposed to much more than their back yards.

Ian finds working with rescues very rewarding and offers 50% off initial consultations when dogs are referred to Bondi Behaviourist by Sydney Dogs and Cats Home.  If you’ve adopted your dog from Sydney Dogs and Cats Home and would like to take Ian up on this offer please contact the team at info@sydneydogsandcatshome.org

Senior Pet Project: Jasper

***Update:  Jasper has found his forever home!***

Lost, wandering the streets, a painful, infected tumour dangling from his chest, this was Jasper's condition when he arrived at Sydney Dogs and Cats Home back in April 2019.

Upon arrival, Jasper was immediately given pain medication and bandaged to provide pain relief and prevent him from scratching the sore tumour. He was also put on a course of antibiotics to help treat the infection on his chest as well as the deep skin infection near his eye.

Poor Jasper had nothing to identify him or his owner. After seven days, with no owner coming forward to reclaim this gentle older man, our vet team went into action. Surgeries were organised to remove both tumours – the one on his chest and one near his eye. Jasper also had his teeth cleaned, and the team desexed him as well.

Post-operatively Jasper's real personality has emerged. When he arrived, Jasper was slow, sluggish and prone to vocalisation. Now Jasper is a new dog! He's happy, affectionate and loves to go for a stroll. A lot more content in the world he rarely vocalises now.

It's thanks to the support of the community and those beautiful individuals who donate to the Senior Pet Project, that we can provide the older residents like Jasper with the essential veterinarian care they need.

Our goal is to raise $150,000 by 30 June in order to fund the Senior Pet Project for the next 12 months.  Donate now to support the Senior Pet Project and give a senior like Jasper a new leash on life.

After spending five weeks in our care, Jasper is ready for his new forever home. You can read Jasper's full profile here.


ABOUT SENIOR PET PROJECT

Our Senior Pet Project, entering its second year, was started as an initiative not only to put a spotlight on these golden oldies to help with their rehoming, but also to raise the funds required for their much needed veterinary care and often prolonged stay at the Home.

With your support we are looking to raise $150,000 by 30 June to fund the Senior Pet Project for the next 12 months, enabling us to give the seniors entering our care a new leash on life.

Support the Senior Pet Project. Donate today.

Senior Pet Project: Monster

When we welcomed Monster, a 13-year-old Maltese/Chihuahua Cross, into our Home in October we knew that this little chap would be a beneficiary of our Senior Pet Project.  Monster, a sweet old gentleman was brought in as a stray.  His fur was dirty and matted, his nails overgrown and his breath putrid.

Our vet team performed a health assessment and it was clear by Monster’s neglected state that this dear boy hadn’t been to a vet or a groomer in a very long time.

Monster was suffering and in pain. The team immediately provided him with pain relief.  Emergency dental surgery was quickly scheduled and performed.  All of Monster’s teeth, bar one healthy tooth, had to be removed.  Monster also received a much-needed bath and clip from our volunteer groomer.   And the team organised for Monster to go into foster care with Fiona, enabling him to recover in a quiet home setting postoperatively.

Moster quickly recovered from his operation and a spritely, happy gentleman emerged.  He fit in so well with his foster family which included beautiful 15-year-old Missy that when the time came for Monster to be rehomed Fiona asked to adopt him.

Renamed Max, our Monster, now spends the days with his best friend Missy and being spoilt by his humans Fiona and Jeff.

With your support we are looking to raise $150,000 by 30 June to fund the Senior Pet Project for the next 12 months, enabling us to provide the seniors with the essential care required to set them up for success in their twilight years.  Donate now to support the Senior Pet Project.


ABOUT SENIOR PET PROJECT

Our Senior Pet Project, entering its second year, was started as an initiative not only to put a spotlight on these golden oldies to help with their rehoming, but also to raise the funds required for their much needed veterinary care and often prolonged stay at the Home.

With your support we are looking to raise $150,000 by 30 June to fund the Senior Pet Project for the next 12 months, enabling us to give the seniors entering our care a new leash on life.

Support the Senior Pet Project. Donate today.

Give a New Leash on Life, Support the Senior Pet Project

As Sydney’s only registered charity pound and active rehoming facility, Sydney Dogs and Cats Home has been opening its doors to lost and abandoned pets for over 73 years. Sadly, embracing neglected seniors is all too familiar to us.

Every year more than 10% of the animals entering the Home are in their twilight years. As heart-breaking as it is, these pets are less likely to be reclaimed than the younger counterparts, and the seniors typically need additional veterinary care.

Our Senior Pet Project, entering its second year, was started as an initiative not only to put a spotlight on these golden oldies to help with their rehoming but also to raise the funds required for their essential veterinary care and often prolonged stay at the Home.

Not surprisingly, the majority of senior cases do require extra veterinary treatment. This additional cost may be the reason why many owners do not reclaim their senior pets. Seniors also tend to have a longer stay in the shelter or foster care whilst we search for a suitable home, and in some cases that one in a million person willing to provide love and palliative care in a pet’s final months, weeks or even days.

With your support we are looking to raise $150,000 by 30 June to fund the Senior Pet Project for the next 12 months, enabling us to provide the seniors with the much-needed care to set them up for success in their twilight years, just like Chance.  Support the Senior Pet Project today.

Senior Pet Project: A Second Chance

At the age of 9 years and 7 months, this sweet gentle lady, who we named Arlo, found herself at Sydney Dogs and Cats Home.  Arlo had escaped her owner’s care and was found and brought into the Home by a council ranger.  The team was eventually able to contact Arlo’s owner but sadly her owner had fallen on difficult times financially and was struggling to find suitable accommodation for them.  Additionally, Arlo was suffering from a degenerative joint disease, evident by a slight limp in her walk, and she would need ongoing veterinary care and treatment.  Arlo’s owner made the decision to not reclaim Arlo but to leave her in our care.

Every year more than 10% of the animals entering the Home are in their twilight years like Arlo, and sadly these pets are less likely to be reclaimed than the younger counterparts.  And like Arlo the seniors typically need additional veterinary care.  In Arlo’s case the team began a course of treatment for Arlo’s osteoarthritis designed to improve the cartilage in her joint.

Our Senior Pet Project, entering its second year, was started as an initiative not only to put a spotlight on these golden oldies to help with their rehoming, but also to raise the funds required for their much needed veterinary care and often prolonged stay at the Home.

Not surprisingly, the majority of senior cases do require extra veterinary treatment. This additional cost may be the reason why many owners choose not to reclaim their senior pets. Seniors also tend to have a longer stay in the shelter or foster care whilst we search for a suitable home, and in some cases that one in a million person willing to provide love and palliative care in a pet’s final months, weeks or even days.

With your support we are looking to raise $150,000 by 30 June to fund the Senior Pet Project for the next 12 months, enabling us to provide the seniors with the much-needed care to set them up for success in their twilight years, just like Arlo.

Fortunately Arlo, now known as Chance, spent only 4 weeks in the Home before finding her humans – Adam and Natalie Goodes, who have become ambassadors for Sydney Dogs and Cats Home’s Senior Pet Project promoting the benefits of adopting a senior pet.

Adam Goodes, former professional AFL player, owner of Chance and Senior Pet Project ambassador said: “We always knew we wanted to adopt a senior pet, giving them a loving and caring home for their golden years. We met our little lady at Sydney Dogs and Cats Home, after a team member suggested we take her out on a walk. The rest is history and she is no longer shy but a happy go-lucky, much-loved member of the Goodes family – people often think she’s a puppy!”

Natalie Goodes added, “Adopting Chance has changed our lives in such a positive way, we think about all our plans with her in mind and actually spend more time at home to be together as a family. She is housebroken, doesn’t chew up our furniture and isn’t destructive – we haven’t had to worry about the ‘puppy phase’. Her love is unconditional, and we can’t get enough of her little butt wiggles every time one of us walks in the door!”

With your support we are looking to raise $150,000 by 30 June to fund the Senior Pet Project for the next 12 months, enabling us to give the seniors entering our care a new leash on life.  Support the Senior Pet Project today.